Archives for June 2012

Home Seller Pitfalls to Avoid

Six years after the market peaked in 2006 and prices started to decline, many sellers are still in denial about the current market value of their homes.  It is difficult for most sellers to accept the reality of today’s home-sale market, whether they bought at or near the peak and will lose money selling today, or bought decades ago but are still stuck at 2006 prices.  One homeowner recently remarked that she was aware that home prices had dropped quite a bit over the last five years, but she felt that her home had not lost any value.

It is hard for homeowners to divorce themselves emotionally from a home they have enjoyed.  This is what sellers need to do so they can make rational decisions about a list price that will actually result in a sale.  This decision should be based on listings that have sold in your area that are considered comparable to your home.  Some sellers go to open houses to evaluate the competition.  If you are still emotionally wrapped up in your home, the exercise can be futile.  You return home feeling that the other homes are not as good as yours.

Put yourself in the buyer’s shoes.  Your house needs to be listed at a price that is enticing to buyers because it represents a good value.  In most areas, buyers are buying ibn a market knowing prices may continue to decline before the market fully recovers.

House Selling Tip: Be wary of real estate agents who tell you that your home will sell for a higher-than-supportable price just to get the listing.  Then they work on you over time until you reduce the price to market value.  Agents refer to this as buying a listing.

Its hard to resist the temptation of trying for a higher price than the comparables indicate.  However, you will not be happy if your home is on the market for months with no activity, and each time you drop the price it feels like too little, too late.  You can end up selling for less later if home prices in your area are still declining.

Listing your home based on what you want or or need to net from the sale will not motivate buyers to pay more.  Buyers pay market value.  They will not overpay in today’s market.

If your home needs a lot of work compared with the competition, you will either need to have work done before selling or discount your price accordingly.

For best results, be realistic about the current market value of your home and what preparation it needs in order to sell successfully in this market.

Understanding Short Sales

A short sale is a sale of a home that is worth less than the mortgage owed.   Because these properties are often listed at a price lower than their values, you may be able to get a good deal, if you have a tremendous amount of patience.   The problem is that the only motivated people in the transaction are the agents and the buyer.  If you decide to make an offer on a short sale, it will generally be submitted by your agent to the seller for acceptance, subject to the short sale lender’s approval.  This can take months, so I tell the buyers, “This will take a lot of time, so don’t call me up, whining about it.”  There really is nothing you can do to speed up their decision.

It is very important to structure the purchase contract such that it gives the buyer an out of the contract if an acceptance is not obtained within a certain time-frame.  Also, it is best to have the different time-frames for inspections, putting the deposit into escrow, obtaining the loan, and so on begin at lender approval of the deal rather than at seller’s acceptance.  We have a very good short sale addendum that is required for every short sale transaction.

It is very important to have a short-sale property inspected by a professional home inspector.  Many times the upside-down seller has not maintained the property.  Very rarely will the short-sale lender agree to pay for any repairs, so it is a good idea to get a contractor’s bid to repair the items so you will know if  the cost is unaffordable.

The short-sale lender will come after the buyer and the agent for money.  One of my buyers said, “Tell them to go pound sand!”  The lender stopped asking him, but then they came after me for some the commission.  If there is more than one lender, the sale is even more tedious.  Unless the lender in first position comes out with what is expected, they will try to cut down on proceeds going to the junior lien holders.

Someone purchasing a short-sale property should just be prepared and patient and don’t get mad (they don’t care!) and a good agent comes in handy, too.