Archives for May 2014

Tax Implications When Selling a Home*

Home sellers used to be penalized when they sold a home, paying huge capital gains taxes on their next tax return. However,the United States government saw fit to change that taxation process with the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997.  Now, many people qualify for no capital gains at all, depending on their income and tax situation. Take a look at some sample situations that can help you to avoid tax-related headaches and stay ahead of the financial curve. Single Owners – If you are a single homeowner, you are not required to pay capital gains unless the profit is higher than $250,000. You can figure out your profit by subtracting the sold price from the original price paid.  From that figure, you can also deduct any major household improvements made over the years, including an additional room or in-ground pool installation. For most homeowners, their profit is conservative, allowing them to pocket the money or put it toward a new property.  Married Homeowners – Because a home may be larger for a married couple, the government stipulates that up to $500,000 in profit is acceptable to avoid taxation. However, there is a significant tax rate when profits are above the $500,000 threshold.  In general, your tax rate is around 20 percent.  For example, your profit is $600,000. You need to pay a 20 percent tax on the $100,000 above the threshold. As a result,you owe $20,000 in taxes alone.  Time Constraints – You must pay capital gains only if you lived in the home for less than two years. For most homeowners, this time constraint is not applicable.  As long as you remain in a home as a primary residence, you can technically sell and buy a home every two years without paying capital gains.  For families trying to grow their family and wealth, this tax relief is a welcome sight. There is no limit to the amount of times you can buy or sell with no tax liability.  Special Circumstances – The government recognizes that there are extenuating circumstances that must be accounted for.  If you bought a house and were transferred to a different state by your employer within one year, for example, you are exempt from paying capital gains.  Other issues, including long-term government or private company duties, free you from paying taxes as well. Documented health problems, such as suffering from cancer, allow you to skip taxes if you must move before the two-year limit. If You Owe – It is best to contact a tax professional.  He can look over your personal situation to find out the tax cost.  In general, tax professionals take the sold price and reduce it with documented capital improvements and depreciation costs.  You can also deduct some of the closing costs to lower your tax liability.  However, high profits mean higher taxes overall.  Selling a home is much easier than it used to be. Go over your personal situation when considering selling prices. Receiving a conservative profit on your home is helpful when it comes to tax liability.

*I am a Realtor, not an accountant or attorney; this post is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace your consulting with a tax professional.