New 1031 Exchange Filing Requirements for California

New §1031 Exchange Filing Requirements for California
There are new annual filing requirements for taxpayers who use Internal Revenue Code Section 1031 to defer gain or loss when selling California property.  Effective January 1, 2014, all taxpayers who defer gain or loss by selling California property and acquire like kind non-California property will have to file a new California information return to track their deferred California sourced gain or loss.  This return will generally be required to be filed annually until deferred California source gain is recognized.  The new form is currently being developed cialis andorre acheter.

This new law will help taxpayers and the Franchise Tax Board (FTB) to keep track of California sourced gain from an exchange.  After exchanging California property for property outside the State many taxpayers later sell said property and their previous deferred California sourced gain is not reported to California.

As an example, let’s say an investor exchanges out of a property in California and there was a gain of $50,000.  Investor then purchases property outside of California deferring the gain.  The investor must now annually report the gain of $50,000 on the new California 1031 information return and when the investor eventually sells the non-California property the investor will have to pay taxes to California.

This new law applies to all individuals, estates and trusts and all business entities regardless of their residency status or commercial domicile.  This new information return is due on the same date that their California return is due.  For those taxpayers who fail to file this new form, the FTB may issue a Notice of Proposed Assessment to adjust their income for the previously deferred gain plus penalties and interest.

 

New Listing Coming Soon

Located in the desirable Lunada Bay area of Palos Verdes Estates, this home has 3162 square feet of living space with 3 bedrooms, family room, gym (could be converted back to 2 more bedrooms, pool, spa, cabana.  The owner is in the midst of refurbishing the home and it will be listed in six weeks or so for approximately $1,750,000.

Office Lease in San Pedro

I have an office suite for lease at 611 W. 6th Street in San Pedro.  It includes a spacious reception area, reception office, three separate offices, break room and 1/2 bathroom.  The rent is $975 per month.  Please contact me to see the space.

Don’t List Your Home Until You Are Ready to Show It

I have noticed that many times in today’s market that a home is listed on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS), but the property cannot be shown until after the first brokers open house or cannot be shown until a week from the date the listing was submitted.  The reason for this delay is often due to fact that the owner needs time to prepare the house for sale.   I urge all home sellers to be ready to show their homes on the date they are listed.  The way our MLS works is that agents with buyers for a house like yours enter their search parameters into the MLS and the buyer may be put on an automatic e-mailing system; when a house that matches a buyer’s criteria is listed on the MLS, he will be automatically notified, many times immediately after the listing was entered.  In today’s market there is a shortage of homes on the market in the Palos Verdes area and in the other South Bay cities.  Buyers who are looking for a home like yours are anxious to see it when it comes on the market.  Being told they must wait “takes the wind out of their sails”.

I recommend being totally prepared to show your home the minute it is put on the market.  There are possibly a number of prospects waiting and I believe your chances of getting top dollar for your home may be better shown to those motivated buyers than waiting to show until after brokers, who may not have buyers for your home, are allowed to stream through it.  If you list your home a week or so before you are ready to show it, the wording, “Will not be listed in the Multiple Listing Service until…” can be added into the listing contract and a waiver filed with our local association of Realtors.

Governor Brown Vetoed Proposed Rent Control Bill

This news just in from the California Association of Realtors:

Yesterday Governor Brown vetoed AB 1229, a bill that proposed to dramatically weaken rent control limitations contained in the landmark “Costa-Hawkins” law sponsored by C.A.R. in 1995. C.A.R. has been aggressively opposing the bill throughout the legislative process and had asked the Governor for a veto.

AB 1229 proposed to undo Costa-Hawkins’ protections by allowing local governments to impose inclusionary zoning on newly constructed single family and rental housing developments.  AB 1229 would have effectively repealed that part of the C.A.R-sponsored Costa-Hawkins legislation that says new construction in a rent control jurisdiction is exempt, or NOT subject to rent control.

Housekeeping Tips

Over the years of my career in real estate, I have learned some interesting housekeeping tips that you may not know about:

1.  Shower door cleaning: When I was in the process of getting my own home ready to market, I was trying to remove soap scum from my shower doors and failing at the task.  I gave up and called a tradesman to replace the doors.  The contractor told me how to clean them and I must share this information because it really works.  Spread shampoo (one without any conditioner in it) on the glass surface; rinse it off; and behold, it works like a charm!

2.  Cleaning sinks, tubs and toilets: There is a miracle product called “Bar Keepers Friend” that can be purchased at Home Depot, Lowes and other such stores.  All I can say is you will be amazed at how this product works.

3.  Maintaining hardwood floors: Usually, just dust mopping is adequate, but when the floors really need more help, I recommend using Murphy’s Oil Soap,  diluted as directed on the bottle.  Damp mop, but do not soak the floors.  Do not let the solution sit, but dry the floor immediately.  I get a towel and “skate” over the floor with it.

4.  Taking care of badly scuffed hardwood floors: One home I was helping an owner get ready for the market had hardwood flooring.  In one of the hallways the floor was really scuffed up.  The owner said he would probably have to re-do the floor, and expensive undertaking.  A quick, very inexpensive fix is to use Old English Scratch Cover, that comes in different shades.  I asked my client’s cleaning lady to try it; the floors looked like new; the home sold within a week.