New 1031 Exchange Filing Requirements for California

New §1031 Exchange Filing Requirements for California
There are new annual filing requirements for taxpayers who use Internal Revenue Code Section 1031 to defer gain or loss when selling California property.  Effective January 1, 2014, all taxpayers who defer gain or loss by selling California property and acquire like kind non-California property will have to file a new California information return to track their deferred California sourced gain or loss.  This return will generally be required to be filed annually until deferred California source gain is recognized.  The new form is currently being developed cialis andorre acheter.

This new law will help taxpayers and the Franchise Tax Board (FTB) to keep track of California sourced gain from an exchange.  After exchanging California property for property outside the State many taxpayers later sell said property and their previous deferred California sourced gain is not reported to California.

As an example, let’s say an investor exchanges out of a property in California and there was a gain of $50,000.  Investor then purchases property outside of California deferring the gain.  The investor must now annually report the gain of $50,000 on the new California 1031 information return and when the investor eventually sells the non-California property the investor will have to pay taxes to California.

This new law applies to all individuals, estates and trusts and all business entities regardless of their residency status or commercial domicile.  This new information return is due on the same date that their California return is due.  For those taxpayers who fail to file this new form, the FTB may issue a Notice of Proposed Assessment to adjust their income for the previously deferred gain plus penalties and interest.

 

Get the App – Palos Verdes Dream Homes

Palos Verdes Dream Homes

 

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Download the App Download the Palos Verdes Dream Homes App for Android download from the google marketplace

Housekeeping Tips

Over the years of my career in real estate, I have learned some interesting housekeeping tips that you may not know about:

1.  Shower door cleaning: When I was in the process of getting my own home ready to market, I was trying to remove soap scum from my shower doors and failing at the task.  I gave up and called a tradesman to replace the doors.  The contractor told me how to clean them and I must share this information because it really works.  Spread shampoo (one without any conditioner in it) on the glass surface; rinse it off; and behold, it works like a charm!

2.  Cleaning sinks, tubs and toilets: There is a miracle product called “Bar Keepers Friend” that can be purchased at Home Depot, Lowes and other such stores.  All I can say is you will be amazed at how this product works.

3.  Maintaining hardwood floors: Usually, just dust mopping is adequate, but when the floors really need more help, I recommend using Murphy’s Oil Soap,  diluted as directed on the bottle.  Damp mop, but do not soak the floors.  Do not let the solution sit, but dry the floor immediately.  I get a towel and “skate” over the floor with it.

4.  Taking care of badly scuffed hardwood floors: One home I was helping an owner get ready for the market had hardwood flooring.  In one of the hallways the floor was really scuffed up.  The owner said he would probably have to re-do the floor, and expensive undertaking.  A quick, very inexpensive fix is to use Old English Scratch Cover, that comes in different shades.  I asked my client’s cleaning lady to try it; the floors looked like new; the home sold within a week.

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed Tax Code Reforms Could Harm Real Estate Recovery

According to the California Association of Realtors, in late June, the U. S. Senate announced plans to adopt a “blank slate” approach to reform the tax code.  A blank slate approach would eliminate all tax expenditures (including tax deductions such as the mortgage interest deduction, tax exemptions such as the capital gains exemptions on the sale of a personal residence, and the deduction of state property taxes).  Senators will have to request tax expenditures be added to the reform legislation, which would raise tax rates.  This approach allows the Senate Finance Committee to highlight just how much tax rates could be reduced by eliminating all the tax expenditures.  Senators have until July 26th to request that real estate expenditures be added to the reform legislation before the Finance Committee begins drafting a tax reform package.  What can you (we) do?  It is imperative that we have our voices heard and encourage Congress to “do no harm” to real estate.  Contact your representatives today.

Countdown to Home Buying

The market is improving; inventory is low.  Check this countdown list to make sure you are ready to purchase:

1.  Get Pre-approved.  You are pre-approved when your credit has been checked and confirmed and your income, assets and employment history have been verified.  Be careful; some so-called pre-approvals are not worth the paper they are written on.  I have received “pre-approval” letters from lenders and submitted them with offers to purchase only to find out later that the buyer was not able to obtain a loan.  Sometimes it is advantageous to work with loan officers at the bank with which you do business, as they have a vested interest in your continuing to do business with them.

2.  Temper your expectations.  Listing inventory in the Palos Verdes area and the entire South Bay is only 50% of what it was last year.  This means that if you want to stick to any sort of budget, you are not likely going to get everything you want or you will have to be patient.  Have a clear understanding of your needs, wants and wishes, so you will take action when the right home becomes available.

3.  Be ready to compete.  Unless you are willing to purchase a home an outlying area or in need of a lot of repairs, prepare yourself to make multiple offers and compete with other buyers in the market.

4.  Be prepared to act quickly.  When you find the home of your dreams, you need to be ready to rush to get it.  If you do not act quickly and start making preparations right away, you may find yourself left out in the cold when it comes time for your offer to be accepted.

5.  Watch your behavior at open houses.  Everything you do and say when in front of the listing agent (seller’s agent) or his representative will inevitably be shared with the seller and may come back to haunt you when your make an offer the purchase the home.  Both being too excited about the home or nit-picking the condition of the home can put you at a disadvantage at the negotiating table.

6.  Call your real estate agent.  Actually, this step should be first.  Contact me at 310-995-3754 or Katie@katiemuck.com as soon as you would like to begin the process!

How To Protect Your Home Investment

Housing prices are slowly becoming a bright spot in the economy with historically low interest rates continuing across the nation.  No one knows, however, where real estate prices will head in the future.  For many individuals, their homes will continue to be their largest asset and a major contributor to building net worth.  Like all investments, you should develop strategies to manage your home prudently.  Here are some “Do’s and Don’ts” to consider:

Don’t stretch to purchase the largest home you can.  The reason homes have contributed significantly to the net worth of many people is that owners retain any price appreciation on their entire properties, even though they only put down ten or twenty per cent of the purchase price.  This fact has caused many people to strain their budgets and purchase the largest home they can afford, hoping the increase in the value will more than offset the sacrifices made along the way.

Before embarking on such a strategy, be aware of all the risks.  If home prices start to fall, you could end up owing more than the house is worth.  If your budget is strained to the limit, you might not have money left over to contribute to a retirement account or college savings plan.  It may be better to purchase a home you can comfortably afford.

Do take into account all of your monthly home payments, not just the mortgage.  Include homeowner’s insurance, flood insurance, mortgage insurance, utilities, garbage collection, cable television, unexpected repairs, taxes and any other obligations.

Don’t take equity out of your home in the form of a home-equity loan or a higher mortgage balance without careful consideration.  While lower interest rates have allowed many homeowners to reduce their monthly mortgage payments, many have also opted to take equity out of their homes and stretch mortgage payments over longer periods.  One of the main advantages of home ownership is that it is a forced savings plan, with part of every mortgage payment going toward equity.  Resist the urge to take the equity and spend it on something else.

Do investigate refinancing when interest rates go down.  If the rate on your mortgage is more than one per cent higher than current interest rates, the cost of refinancing may be worth it.

Do make sure you have adequate insurance.  Your homeowners insurance policy should be sufficient to completely rebuild and refurnish your home in the event of a disaster.  Check with local contractors for the cost-per-square-foot to rebuild in your area.  Check the limits of your policy every year and increase them if needed.  You will probably want a guaranteed replacement clause, which pays for the entire cost of rebuilding your home.

Do inventory everything in your home.  Include everything in your home, systematically working your way around each room  Keep receipts for larger items with the inventory.  This will help substantiate a claim if your home and its contents are every destroyed.

Bottom line: On a long-term basis, a home is a good investment.  By properly managing it, you can make it even better.