When Selling, Don’t Overlook the Details

There are so many things to do when you are selling you home: making sure the house is clean all the time; making sure you answer all the calls from agents wanting to show it to prospective buyers; finding somewhere to go when showings take place; and so on and so on.

A very important part of the marketing process (a detail), is the listing itself. Don’t forget to ask your agent (hopefully me) to show you the listing submitted to the Multiple Listing Service. I’ve noticed that some agents take tons of pictures and many of them do not show the best features of your home. A townhouse listing I was looking at had ten pictures of the outside stairways, the front door, and even a picture of a neighbor’s dumpster! It’s not the number of pictures, it’s the pictures themselves. Also, we are able to label the pictures, and they should all be labeled. If your property has a view of the ocean, coastline or city lights, there should be good photos of the view, not extensive verbiage about how spectacular the view is. If the listing reads, “spectacular, panoramic views of the ocean and coastline”, and a prospect sees the home and notices that there is only that view if you are out on a deck with a telescope, he may be so disappointed that he will pass on your home. However, if the description is accurate, or maybe even under-played a little, the prospect may just fall in love with the view, and the offer to purchase will be put on the table. Unless your bathrooms are simply spectacular, there should not be pictures of them. If you have a large yard, as long as it is well kept, include pictures that show how large it is.

If the showing appointment times are limited and your home is difficult to show, it will be difficult to sell. Perhaps asking for offers “subject to inspection” may be an option.

I’m sure I haven’t covered all the little details, but remember that “the devil’s in them”.

A Brief Suggestion for Those Looking at Houses to Buy

When I show homes to potential buyers, I notice that I am always looking up toward the ceiling in the rooms. I often notice evidence of leaks. It dawned on me that when buyers are viewing homes, if they are couples, one should be looking up, as I do, but the other should be looking down. That way, any potential problems with the property should be detected.

Some Little Tips for Selling Your Home

 

1. Pricing it right: Find out what your house is worth and work with your agent (hopefully me!) to establish a price that will bring buyers with offers.

2. Half-empty closets: Storage is something a buyer is looking for and never have enough of. Take half the stuff out of your closets, then neatly organize what is left. Be sure to keep all your closets and cabinets clean and tidy.

3. Light it up: Maximize the light in your home. Take down the drapes, clean the windows, change the lampshades, and increase the wattage of your light bulbs.

4. Conceal your pets: Not everyone is a dog or cat lover. The bowl of dog food, the smell of the litter box, tufts of pet hair may give buyers the impression that your house is not clean.

5. Do not over upgrade: Quick fixes before selling should pay off, but major makeovers may not. Do updates that that will pay off and get you top dollar. Get a new fresh coat of paint on the walls (I have a great painter, if you need one), replace door handles and cabinet knobs, fix leaky faucets and clean the grout (a toothbrush with cleanser works),

6. Depersonalize: The more personal items in your house, the less potential buyers can visualize themselves living there. Also, I have had buyers who looked at personal items so much that they really did not see the features of the home.

Homebuyer Do’s and Don’ts When Getting a Loan

  • DO continue to make payments on time for current mortgages, cars, credit cards, etc..
  • DO paper trail, document, and explain any large or unusual deposits or withdrawals into accounts such as checking, savings, stock, etc.
  • DO keep pay stubs, bank statements, tax forms, etc., in case the lender needs to update the documentation prior to closing.
  • DO ask questions if something is unclear about the loan program, fees, and/or loan conditions.
  • DO let the loan officer or mortgage broker know if anything changes, for example, your employment, income, assets, credit history, etc.
  • DO document that the earnest money deposit has cleared your account; obtain a copy of the cancelled check and/or statement that reflects the funds have cleared.
  • DO lock-in the interest rate.  These are ordinarily thirty to sixty days and definitely worth it if rates are trending upward.
  • DO have homeowner’s insurance agent information available and provide updated documentation (pay stubs, bank statements, etc.) in a timely manner so as not to delay the closing.
  • DO NOT increase credit card balances and/or loan balances.
  • DO NOT apply for additional or new credit or put balances on a paid credit card.
  • DO NOT ignore late payment and/or collection notices that are received during the loan process.
  • DO NOT purchase anything that is “same as cash”, as it will show on the credit report as a new debt.
  • DO NOT buy furniture, a new car or appliances on credit until after closing.  This is the most common “don’t” action that has occurred during my sales.
  • DO NOT lend money to family members or friends if the money is needed for closing.
  • DO NOT store money at home; place it in a bank account so it can be documented as savings throughout the loan process and can qualify as assets on hand.
  • DO NOT have overdrafts on a checking account.
  • DO NOT quit or change jobs during the loan process.

 

 

How the Real Estate Business Works

I was recently working with a prospect who was looking for a lease property and that experience is what has prompted me to write this post.  I met this person and showed her some homes.  I had mentioned to her that the homes she was finding on other web sites came from our Multiple Listing Service and I would be able to show those properties.  She notified me about homes she found on one of the sites but when I looked them up, they were not listed.  I told her she would have to contact the owner or agent direct and I was kicking myself because I did not explain to her how our business works.

The Multiple Listing Service is not just a list of homes on the market.  When a property is listed for sale or lease, that listing agent is offering compensation to the cooperating agent.  If the commission is 6% the compensation to the cooperating agent is usually 3%.  If a property is not listed we cooperating agents are not entitled to a commission; therefore, we may be working for nothing, which, of course, agents cannot afford to do.

We have the capability of putting prospects on an auto-e-mail program that will notify them when new listings come on the market.  A person’s finding just the right property, I believe, is contingent upon working with an agent he trusts to keep him apprised of new or price-changed listings and to be there to show him the property.  That buyer’s agent will be working just for that buyer.  Look for an agent who is not only responsive, but also a good negotiator who is up on the latest legal requirements for real estate transactions cialis 20mg en ligne.  Ask the agent for recommendations from other satisfied buyers.  A listing agent who represents you as a buyer may have a conflict of interest, as he is also representing the seller.  Be sure to ask how he will handle the situation.  He will have to ask himself over and over, “Is this in the seller’s best interest; is this fair to the buyer?”

Good luck with your real estate purchase. and be sure to contact me if you need assistance.

Don’t List Your Home Until You Are Ready to Show It

I have noticed that many times in today’s market that a home is listed on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS), but the property cannot be shown until after the first brokers open house or cannot be shown until a week from the date the listing was submitted.  The reason for this delay is often due to fact that the owner needs time to prepare the house for sale.   I urge all home sellers to be ready to show their homes on the date they are listed.  The way our MLS works is that agents with buyers for a house like yours enter their search parameters into the MLS and the buyer may be put on an automatic e-mailing system; when a house that matches a buyer’s criteria is listed on the MLS, he will be automatically notified, many times immediately after the listing was entered.  In today’s market there is a shortage of homes on the market in the Palos Verdes area and in the other South Bay cities.  Buyers who are looking for a home like yours are anxious to see it when it comes on the market.  Being told they must wait “takes the wind out of their sails”.

I recommend being totally prepared to show your home the minute it is put on the market.  There are possibly a number of prospects waiting and I believe your chances of getting top dollar for your home may be better shown to those motivated buyers than waiting to show until after brokers, who may not have buyers for your home, are allowed to stream through it.  If you list your home a week or so before you are ready to show it, the wording, “Will not be listed in the Multiple Listing Service until…” can be added into the listing contract and a waiver filed with our local association of Realtors.