Homebuyer Do’s and Don’ts When Getting a Loan

  • DO continue to make payments on time for current mortgages, cars, credit cards, etc..
  • DO paper trail, document, and explain any large or unusual deposits or withdrawals into accounts such as checking, savings, stock, etc.
  • DO keep pay stubs, bank statements, tax forms, etc., in case the lender needs to update the documentation prior to closing.
  • DO ask questions if something is unclear about the loan program, fees, and/or loan conditions.
  • DO let the loan officer or mortgage broker know if anything changes, for example, your employment, income, assets, credit history, etc.
  • DO document that the earnest money deposit has cleared your account; obtain a copy of the cancelled check and/or statement that reflects the funds have cleared.
  • DO lock-in the interest rate.  These are ordinarily thirty to sixty days and definitely worth it if rates are trending upward.
  • DO have homeowner’s insurance agent information available and provide updated documentation (pay stubs, bank statements, etc.) in a timely manner so as not to delay the closing.
  • DO NOT increase credit card balances and/or loan balances.
  • DO NOT apply for additional or new credit or put balances on a paid credit card.
  • DO NOT ignore late payment and/or collection notices that are received during the loan process.
  • DO NOT purchase anything that is “same as cash”, as it will show on the credit report as a new debt.
  • DO NOT buy furniture, a new car or appliances on credit until after closing.  This is the most common “don’t” action that has occurred during my sales.
  • DO NOT lend money to family members or friends if the money is needed for closing.
  • DO NOT store money at home; place it in a bank account so it can be documented as savings throughout the loan process and can qualify as assets on hand.
  • DO NOT have overdrafts on a checking account.
  • DO NOT quit or change jobs during the loan process.

 

 

De-clutter Your Home

Consider this list of creative ways to de-clutter your home:

1. Give yourself 5 solid minutes: Put at least twenty-five items away in five minutes.  If the item does not have a home, or is no longer needed, place it in a donation box.  2. Give away one item each day. This is manageable de-cluttering, simply done one item at a time.  3.  Fill one trash bag: This is an easy way to process excess papers and packaging that is no longer necessary.  When the bag is full, you are done with that task.   4.  Try the Closet Hanger Experiment: To identify wardrobe pieces to clear out, hang all your clothes with the hangers in the reverse direction.  After you wear an item, return it to the closet with the hanger facing the correct direction.  After six months, you will have a clear picture of which clothes you can easily discard.   5.  Take the 12-12-12 Challenge: A simple task of locating twelve items to throw away, twelve items to donate, and twelve items to be returned to their proper home can be a really fun and exciting way to quickly organize thirty-six things in your house. You can select a smaller number for children to process.  6. The Four-Box Method: As you set out to de-clutter an area, set up four boxes:  trash, give away, keep, and relocate.  Each item in every room is placed into one of the four categories.  No item is passed over; each is considered individually.  Some projects may take an hour and others may take days or weeks but the technique and principles remain the same.  No matter what you choose to help you get started – whether it be one of these six or one of countless others – the goal is to take your first step with excitement behind it.  There is a beautiful world of freedom hiding behind that clutter.

Interesting 90275 ZIP Code Facts

The 90275 zip code is the City of Rancho Palos Verdes.  There are 15,633 households of which 76% are owner occupied; 66% are married; 39% have children.   The median home sales price is $845,000.  The median age of the inhabitants of this zip code is 32.37 years; 33% have bachelor degrees and 23% have graduate degrees.  82% are white collar workers, mostly in service industries and most commute by car thirty-one minutes to their places of work.

This information was obtained from the Realist tax portion of our Multiple Listing Service and though believed to be accurate, is not guaranteed.

 

How the Real Estate Business Works

I was recently working with a prospect who was looking for a lease property and that experience is what has prompted me to write this post.  I met this person and showed her some homes.  I had mentioned to her that the homes she was finding on other web sites came from our Multiple Listing Service and I would be able to show those properties.  She notified me about homes she found on one of the sites but when I looked them up, they were not listed.  I told her she would have to contact the owner or agent direct and I was kicking myself because I did not explain to her how our business works.

The Multiple Listing Service is not just a list of homes on the market.  When a property is listed for sale or lease, that listing agent is offering compensation to the cooperating agent.  If the commission is 6% the compensation to the cooperating agent is usually 3%.  If a property is not listed we cooperating agents are not entitled to a commission; therefore, we may be working for nothing, which, of course, agents cannot afford to do.

We have the capability of putting prospects on an auto-e-mail program that will notify them when new listings come on the market.  A person’s finding just the right property, I believe, is contingent upon working with an agent he trusts to keep him apprised of new or price-changed listings and to be there to show him the property.  That buyer’s agent will be working just for that buyer.  Look for an agent who is not only responsive, but also a good negotiator who is up on the latest legal requirements for real estate transactions cialis 20mg en ligne.  Ask the agent for recommendations from other satisfied buyers.  A listing agent who represents you as a buyer may have a conflict of interest, as he is also representing the seller.  Be sure to ask how he will handle the situation.  He will have to ask himself over and over, “Is this in the seller’s best interest; is this fair to the buyer?”

Good luck with your real estate purchase. and be sure to contact me if you need assistance.

Proposed Tax Code Reforms Could Harm Real Estate Recovery

According to the California Association of Realtors, in late June, the U. S. Senate announced plans to adopt a “blank slate” approach to reform the tax code.  A blank slate approach would eliminate all tax expenditures (including tax deductions such as the mortgage interest deduction, tax exemptions such as the capital gains exemptions on the sale of a personal residence, and the deduction of state property taxes).  Senators will have to request tax expenditures be added to the reform legislation, which would raise tax rates.  This approach allows the Senate Finance Committee to highlight just how much tax rates could be reduced by eliminating all the tax expenditures.  Senators have until July 26th to request that real estate expenditures be added to the reform legislation before the Finance Committee begins drafting a tax reform package.  What can you (we) do?  It is imperative that we have our voices heard and encourage Congress to “do no harm” to real estate.  Contact your representatives today.

Landlord-Tenant Relationships: Landlord’s Right to Entry

Note:  This post is intended to provide answers to general questions and the information was provided by our legal department.  Individuals should always seek the advice of an attorney regarding their specific situations.

According to the California Association of Realtors Residential Lease or Month-to-Month Rental Agreement, landlords are permitted to enter a tenant’s residential premises only under certain conditions, some of which require written or oral notice to the tenant and other obligations.  A tenant cannot waive any of the rights outlined below.

A landlord has the right to enter a dwelling under the following circumstances:

(1)  An emergency on the property

(2)  To make necessary/agreed upon repairs

(3)  To show the property to prospective or actual purchasers, tenants, lenders, appraisers or contractors

(4)  When the tenant has abandoned or surrendered the property

(5)  Pursuant to court order

Entry During Normal Business Hours: A landlord may only enter the premises during “normal business hours”- typically excluding evenings and weekends, with the exception of emergencies, abandonment or surrender by the tenant or a tenant’s consent at the time of entry.

Reasonable Notice: The default notice of entry requirement is 48-hour written notice.  Notice of entry by a landlord must be submitted, in writing, prior to entry.  A written notice should include the date, approximate time and purpose of entry.  However, if the landlord and tenant orally agree, that will be sufficient to permit entry for the purpose of agreed repairs/services, provided that they agree on the date and time of entry and that entry occurs within one week of the agreement.

Notice may be personally delivered to the tenant, mailed to the tenant six days prior to the intended entry, left with someone of “suitable age and discretion” at the property or left on, near, or under the entry door in such a manner that it could be discovered by a reasonable person.

24 Hour Notice: The landlord or landlord’s agent may show the tenant’s unit to a prospective or actual purchaser with 24 hour oral notice for 120 days after the landlord or his agent has provided the tenant with written notification that the property is for sale.  At the time of entry, the landlord or agent must leave a written confirmation of entry inside the premises.

Notice is NOT required in the following circumstances:

(1)  An emergency on the property

(2)  The tenant is present and consents to the entry at the time of entry

(3)  The tenant has abandoned or surrendered the unit